Scottish Land Commission: Land access a critical barrier for new entrants



Bob McIntosh

Land access is a critical barrier for new entrants to agriculture in Scotland according to research published today.

The report, prepared for the Scottish Land Commission by The James Hutton Institute, suggests that existing farmers and landowners are well placed to offer greater opportunities to new entrants – and enhance their own businesses at the same time.

A priority area of work for the Land Commission is agricultural holdings and how to create and sustain a thriving agricultural sector in Scotland.  The James Hutton Institute was commissioned to investigate new models and structures to increase the availability of land for new entrants; provide practical guidance on existing joint venture models; identify barriers to succession and retirement; and develop a baseline for measuring success.

The report explores:

  • Current experience and understanding of joint venture options such as contract farming, partnerships, share farming, agricultural tenancies, and leasing/licensing
  • The potential for tax interventions, with a particular focus on income tax relief in relation to tenancy creation/length
    English, Welsh, and Irish experience of land matching services
  • The development internationally of farm incubators for new businesses.

In particular the report highlights the need to address issues around the balance of risk and reward on the part of existing farmers/landowners when implementing these models, the profitability of new entrant farming businesses, and the need for trust and relationship building in developing joint ventures.

Speaking about the report, Tenant Farming Commissioner (TFC), Bob McIntosh, said: “One of the biggest issues facing new entrants to tenant farming is the lack of access to land. For Scotland to have a successful farming sector there needs to be new entrants to drive innovation and best practice.

“This report explores a number of ways for increasing the availability of land. Working with NFUS and Scotland’s Farm Advisory Service, we will be holding a series of workshops in late summer, looking at the options available to existing farmers and landowners, such as joint ventures and share farming, to offer opportunities for new entrants.”