Articles



Blog: Raising the bar on legal technology

A data breach is the unintended disclosure of private data. For some, this means clients’ personal details, for others, it is a leak of critical data about a major acquisition or merger. Every hour approximately 157,154 records are stolen or leaked into the public domain and the cost of a data breach has risen 29 per cent since 2013, with an average cost per incident of $4 million in 2016.

Published 27 January 2017

Blog: The year ahead for employment law

Katy Wedderburn takes a look at the year ahead in employment law.

Published 24 January 2017

Blog: Consumers in the dark about Home Free Protected Trust Deeds

Scottish consumers are not getting a fair deal. Their homes are being placed at risk because they are being denied solutions that are enshrined in legislation, writes Alan McIntosh.

Published 20 January 2017

Blog: Wide scope of disability discrimination claims

A recent decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has shed light on the way that tribunals should interpret the test for disability discrimination, explains Douglas Strang.

Published 11 January 2017

John Sturrock QC: Alternative routes to effective solutions

I was delighted to read my friend Angela Grahame QC’s article recently. As the recently elected Vice Dean of the Faculty of Advocates, Angela is bringing a freshness and agility of thought to her work in that role. And, as a regular tweeter, she is also bringing a contemporary joie de vivre that is brightening up perceptions of the Scottish Bar. More than that, though, she is seeing things as they are in 2017, even if that means tackling some shibboleths associated with the law and its practice.

Published 9 January 2017

Blog: Occupiers’ Liability – babysit at your peril

Julie Hamilton considers occupiers' liability in the wake of Craig Anderson.With parents’ demanding, varied and ever changing work schedules the need for alternative child care arrangements is on the rise, with many parents becoming reliant upon childminders, family and friends now more than ever. The recent decision of Craig Anderson v John Imrie and Antoinette Imrie highlights the importance of considering the “what if” scenario in terms of parental supervision whilst other children are in your care.

Published 6 January 2017

Blog: Banking disputes turned professional negligence claims

Liina Tulk considers circumstances where a banking dispute can turn into a professional negligence claim against previous lawyers.

Published 5 January 2017

Blog: PI arbitration – coming to a case near you in 2017

Angela Grahame QC, Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Advocates discusses a new Faculty arbitration scheme intended to sidestep court delays and reduce costs.

Published 4 January 2017

Blog: Six months on – Brexit and employment law

Katy Wedderburn considers the implications of Brexit on employment law six months after the vote.

Published 4 January 2017

Blog: Tenant amnesty or confusion?

Christopher Lindley explains how new agricultural holdings provisions will work.

Published 19 December 2016

Former SHRC chair talks human rights with Law Society

The Law Society of Scotland spoke to Professor Alan Miller, special envoy of the Global Alliance of National Human Rights Institutions and former chair of the Scottish Human Rights Commission, on International Human Rights Day 2016, which marks the 68th anniversary of the United Nations General Assembly adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Published 12 December 2016

Blog: Gender pay gap reporting regulations – is your business ready?

The UK government has published the final draft of the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017, which are set to come into force in April 2017 and which will see larger employers reporting on their gender pay gap, explains Katy Wedderburn.

Published 12 December 2016

Blog: Rules on public contract changes are clear as mud

Strict rules rightly govern contracts awarded by public bodies, and, in some cases, by utilities. Contractors must make clear not just their costs, but also exactly what they will do: so what happens when the buyer’s requirements change during a project? Recent regulations which sought to offer clarity have simply shifted this grey area, write Mark Macaulay (pictured right) and David Mcgowan (pictured below).

Published 28 November 2016