Articles



Sir David Edward 'could be persuaded' to vote for Scottish independence

Professor Sir David Edward, the former European Court of Justice judge, said Brexit has left him receptive to Scottish independence.

Published 4 February 2019

Lorna Ferguson: Accidents in the workplace

The effects of a change in the law on workplace regulations introduced some five years ago are still to fully reveal themselves in Scotland, writes Lorna Ferguson.

Published 4 February 2019

Millions of hours' unpaid work generated by community payback orders

People serving community payback orders (CPO) since their introduction in 2011 have generated around seven million hours of unpaid work, according to new figures.

Published 4 February 2019

Child migrants sent to former colonies by UK government to be compensated

Child migrants sent away by the UK government are to be each given £20,000 in compensation by the state.

Published 4 February 2019

England: Lawyer casts doubt on new powers for victims to challenge Parole Board decisions

A lawyer has cast doubt on the effectiveness of new powers to be given to victims of serious crimes to challenge Parole Board decisions on the release of prisoners.

Published 4 February 2019

Police chief cleared in firearms misconduct probe

A police chief has been cleared over claims of improper use of the force's firing range, The Herald reports.

Published 4 February 2019

New fire safety standards to be introduced in 2021

New rules to reduce deaths in household fires have been announced, with improved standards introduced for fire and smoke alarms in Scottish homes.

Published 4 February 2019

First conviction for female genital mutilation in UK secured

A woman who mutilated her three-year-old child has become the first person in the UK to be convicted of female genital mutilation (FGM).

Published 4 February 2019

Aberdeen sees biggest improvement in home affordability

A study into Scotland’s most and least affordable cities has found that Aberdeen has seen the biggest boost in home affordability over the last five years.

Published 4 February 2019

US: Lawyer sues Apple over allegations FaceTime bug enabled eavesdropping on client meeting

A Texas lawyer is suing Apple after its FaceTime bug allegedly allowed someone to overhear his confidential meeting with a client.

Published 4 February 2019

And finally... parklife

A sheriff has banned a man from shouting in his own flat.

Published 4 February 2019

Judge rejects human rights challenge to Scots law ‘fixed penalty notice’ scheme 

A teenager who claimed that Scottish legislation on “fixed penalty notices” breached European human rights law on the basis that there was no means of challenging the charge if an individual failed to ask to be tried for the alleged offence within the statutory 28-day time limit has had his case dismissed.

Published 1 February 2019

Law Society of Scotland launches financial impropriety hotline

Individuals with concerns that members of the legal community are involved with financial improprieties or money laundering can now anonymously report their concerns to the professional body for Scottish solicitors.

Published 1 February 2019

Brexit Implications for family law III – where there are advantages to being old

Brexit is starting to get real, with the detail of the ‘no deal’ provision being put in place. Continuing on from her earlier two articles on Brexit and family law (Part I, Part II), Rachael Kelsey now looks at what all family lawyers (specialists or those with a more general practice) need to know if we end up with no deal…

Published 1 February 2019

Success in the Supreme Court for victims of historical family violence and abuse

The UK government has recently announced that the “same roof” rule in terms of criminal injuries compensation is to be abolished. This rule precludes compensation for victims of violence at the hands of members of the same family with whom they were living before October 1979.

Published 1 February 2019