leases



Legal & General's new leasing model 'potentially game-changing'

Major retail property owner Legal & General has changed its leasing model from one of long-term leases to flexible terms that see rent linked to store performance.

Published 30 July 2020

England: ‘No DSS’ letting policy found to be unlawful in ‘momentous ruling’

Blanket bans on renting properties to people on housing benefit are unlawful and discriminatory, a judge in England has ruled.

Published 14 July 2020

Scottish Labour launches petition to ‘save bill to protect renters’

A petition has been launched calling on the Scottish government to formally adopt the Fair Rents (Scotland) Members Bill after the proposed legislation was dropped by the Scottish Parliament’s local government committee.

Published 7 July 2020

'Harsh blow' dealt to student accommodation sector

A "harsh blow" has been dealt to the student accommodation sector with almost £100 million in rent waived, lawyers have said.

Published 15 June 2020

Bill to control rent levels introduced at Holyrood

A bill to control rent levels has been introduced at Holyrood.

Published 4 June 2020

Tom Marshall: When is a factor not a factor?

The recent decision of the Inner House in Proven Properties (Scotland) Limited, reported in Scottish Legal News on 14 May, raises questions about the effectiveness, or at least the scope, of the Property Factors (Scotland) Act 2011, writes Tom Marshall.

Published 21 May 2020

New legislation to introduce student accommodation notice periods

Notice periods for student accommodation are to be introduced as part of new emergency coronavirus legislation to be lodged at the Scottish Parliament this week.

Published 11 May 2020

‘Mary Barbour Bill’ lodged by Scottish Labour

A bill to limit private sector rent rises and to increase the availability of information available to tenants has been lodged by Scottish Labour’s housing spokesperson Pauline McNeill MSP.

Published 24 April 2020

Stephen Webster: COVID-19 and commercial leases

The Coronavirus (Scotland) Act 2020 came into force on 6 April 2020. In relation to commercial leases, the act gives tenants under commercial leases in Scotland additional protection from irritancy (i.e. forfeiture or termination). This protection is similar (although not identical) to the protection already given to tenants in England by the Coronavirus Act 2020 (which received Royal Assent on 25 March). The additional protection is temporary in nature – initially until 30 September 2020. However, the Scottish ministers have power to extend the protected period as far as 30 September 2021, as well as to bring forward its expiry date.

Published 9 April 2020

Stephanie Zak: Landlords must ensure coronavirus crisis agreements are documented

We have all heard the phrase “no good deed goes unpunished” and it seems very appropriate in the rental market at this extremely difficult time, writes Stephanie Zak.

Published 7 April 2020

Blog: Coronavirus support for commercial tenants

Janet McIntyre and Gary Thomas summarise the details of emergency legislation introduced in Scotland to prevent the eviction of commercial tenants who are unable to pay their rent because of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Published 6 April 2020

Stephen Webster: What shape should commercial lease reform take?

Stephen Webster considers the issues surrounding the reform of commercial leases.

Published 4 February 2020

Scots landlords face ten months without rental income under new system

Scottish landlords are now facing a ten-month legal delay to evict tenants who refuse to pay rent, new research has revealed.

Published 13 January 2020

Councils to be given powers to regulate Airbnb-style lets

Local authorities are to be given new powers to regulate short-term lets such as those offered on Airbnb where they decide this is in the interests of local communities.

Published 9 January 2020

Commercial rent disputes drop to five-year low in Scotland

The number of commercial rent disputes reaching a third party in Scotland fell to its lowest level for more than five years, according to analysis from Knight Frank.

Published 30 May 2019